How to get your paper published (short course) at EGU 2017

Ross Woods (University of Bristol) taught this year’s How to write a paper short course, focussing on “How to get your hydrology paper published – dealing with editors, reviews, and revisions”. The slides of the short course are available online.

On our website, you can also find the slides of previous versions of How to write a paper.

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YHS @ EGU17 | EVENT SCHEDULE

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Research “Hylight”: CO2‐vegetation feedbacks and other climate changes implicated in reducing base flow by Ralph Trancoso et al.

Recently, Ralph Trancoso and colleagues published a paper on CO2‐vegetation feedbacks and river flow. We decided to ask him a couple of questions.

Q: Where are you from, where are you based, and what are your current research interests?

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Ralph Trancoso

A: I am from Brazil, and have moved to Brisbane in Australia, about four years ago, to undertake my PhD at the University of Queensland. Having finished PhD a couple of months ago, I am now working for the Queensland government. My current main research focus is catchment ecohydrology. By integrating hydrology, remote sensing and ecosystem sciences, I explore the spatio-temporal variability of catchments biophysical properties to generate new insights into their hydrological functioning and changes. I compare the water and energy exchanges of many catchments spanning large extents to investigate large-scale ecohydrological patterns. Continue reading

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Research “Hylight”: The global distribution and dynamics of surface soil moisture by Kaighin McColl et al.

mccollThis year, Kaighin McColl published a paper on global distribution and dynamics of surface soil moisture, based on NASA’s SMAP satellite. We decided to ask him a couple of questions about him and his research.

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10 guidelines for an awesome poster

A –Streams of Thought– contribution by Andrea Popp.

A scientific poster is a visual communication tool summarizing your work and encouraging conversation with colleagues. However, posters are often poorly designed, e.g., they are densely packed and overloaded with text. This makes it difficult and tiring for the audience to understand the content. The following list provides 10 guidelines for an awesome poster to help you to communicate your work efficiently. We spiced this blog with insider tips from recent EGU and AGU Outstanding Student Poster Award winners (Skuyler Herzog, Ingo Heidbüchel, and Michael Stölzle).

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