Call for Applicants — IAHS Early Career Committee

Early Career scientists make up a significant amount of our community, creating an opportunity to include a new generation of hydrologists as active contributors to IAHS. Early Career scientist involvement in geoscientific organizations has rapidly increased over recent years. Organizations such as the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the European Geosciences Union (EGU) have adopted Early Career representation in committees, board and executive committees.

During its Bureau Meeting in July 2017 (held in Port Elizabeth, South Africa following the IAHS Scientific Assembly 2017), IAHS decided to strengthen its Early Career scientist representation to enable more active participation of those members within IAHS Commissions and Working Groups. To achieve this goal, in line with the proposal submitted by Tim van Emmerik and Nilay Dogulu—and approved by the Bureau members—IAHS will establish an Early Career Committee (ECC) consisting of the Early Career Representative of each IAHS Commission plus a chair and co-chair. The IAHS definition of Early Career embraces scientists up to 5 years after completion of the PhD (allowing for an extra year per child for parents if they took parental leave).

IAHS Early Career Committee (ECC) structure

The ECC is aimed at representing the Early Career membership of the IAHS at the highest level, and within each Commission. ECC members are dedicated to fostering dialogue between Early Career members, and between current and future generations of hydrologists. The ECC chair will be appointed by the IAHS Bureau and will join the IAHS Bureau meetings as an observer. The chair will be encouraged to also be an active member of the Young Hydrologic Society to assure strong connections with other Early Career initiatives in the hydrological community.

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Towards Regional Information to Improve Our Understanding on Weather, Water, and Climate Extreme Events

A –Streams of Thought– contribution by  Caroline Aubry-Wake, Gaby Langendijk, Marisol Osman, Carla Gulizia.

On May 3-5, 40 early careers researchers from 23 different countries grouped together for an in-depth interdisciplinary discussion on generating regional information to improve our understanding of weather, water and climate extreme events. This workshop, organized jointly by the Young Earth System Scientist (YESS) and the Young Hydrologic Society (YHS), took place prior to the 2018 GEWEX Open Science Conference (OSC). The goal of the workshop was to develop a shared ECR vision on challenges and ways forward to enhance the generation of usable regional information for water, weather and climate extremes, and the utility of that information for users, decision makers and other stakeholders. During the three days, the discussions centered on three topics: data sources (conventional and unconventional), scale-interactions and user needs.

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Some tips on how to write a paper (EGU 2018)

The following points summarize some tips that were provided during the short course ‘How to write (and publish) a scientific paper in Hydrology’ held at the 2018 EGU General Assembly in Vienna. The tips are based on the input from the expert panel consisting of Hannah Cloke (University of Reading), Giuliano Di Baldassarre (Uppsala University), Ciaran Harman (Johns Hopkins University) and Margaret Shanafield (Flinders University).

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Hydroinformatics for hydrology: extreme value modelling

At the EGU General Assembly 2018 in Vienna, “Hydroinformatics for hydrology” short course (SC) was run for the fourth time. The previous themes of the SC were data-driven and hybrid techniques, data assimilation, and geostatistical modelling. And this year the focus was extreme value modelling. Participants of the SC were given a state-of-the-science overview of different aspects in extreme value analysis along with relevant case studies. Available R functions for extreme value analysis were also introduced. Thanks to Hugo’s excellent lecture, we now know common issues and pitfalls in using extreme value models (i.e. modelling choices and assumptions). We would like to thank Dr. Hugo Winter from EDF Energy for delivering the lecture. You can find his lecture slides (and exercises) here:

Slides
Exercises

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Research “Hylight”: Social and structural patterns of drought-related water conservation and rebound by Gonzales & Ajami (2017)

By Natasha Krell

DSC07105.JPGIn December 2017, Patricia Gonzalez and her colleagues published a paper on a novel water demand system dynamics model that integrates social and structural drivers of water conservation in WRR. We asked her a couple of questions.

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